Claims about Frozen Lemon as a Cure for Diabetes

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WHAT IS THE TRENDING NEWS STORY

Believe It Or Not, Use Frozen Lemons And Say Goodbye To Diabetes, Tumors, Overweight

An article stating that frozen lemon can be used to get rid off diabetes, cancer, obesity, and other health problems.[1]

WHY THE STORY HAS MISINFORMATION

Several studies highlighted lemons as important health-promoting fruit rich in phenolic compounds (mainly flavonoids) as well as vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, essential oils, and carotenoids.[2][3]

Many studies have investigated the role of flavonoids in the prevention of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. However, there is no clear evidence to definitively prove the findings of these research studies.[4][5][6][7]

Lemon and Oral Health

Oral health is related to diet in many ways, however, the most significant effect of nutrition on teeth is the local action of diet in the mouth on the development of dental caries and enamel erosion. Dental erosion is increasing and is associated with dietary acids, of which lemon juice may provide a considerable amount.[8]

A recent study performed on bovine teeth, lemon juice was found to cause considerable erosion of teeth enamel and dentine even more than erosion caused by Coca-Cola.[9]

Lemon and Diabetes

Very few research studies have investigated the potential benefit of eating lemons in diabetic patients. A recent meta-analysis found that eating cruciferous vegetables may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes but not citrus fruits.[10]

The citrus fruits, such as lemon, do contain flavonoids, naringin, and naringenin. But again, there are very few studies performed with a detailed analysis of the pharmacokinetics of naringin and naringenin.[11][12]

Although naringin has shown some promise in lowering the blood sugar levels, yet most of the research reported was mainly conducted on experimental animals and there are no studies on humans to prove that affect.[13][14][15][16][17][18]

Lemon and Cancer

Some analysis studies have found that people who eat the most citrus fruit have a lower risk of certain types of cancer,[19][20] while other studies strongly contradict these findings.[21][22][23]

The association between the intake of citrus fruits and the risk of some types of cancer varied substantially across the studies.[24][25]

In test tubes, many compounds from lemons have killed cancer cells. However, many things can kill cancer in a test tube, and that does not mean they will work the same way in the human body.[26][27] Some researchers think that plant compounds found in lemons, such as limonene and naringenin, could have anti-cancer effects. Yet this hypothesis also needs further investigation.[28][29][30][31]

Researchers have also been encouraged by animal studies showing that D-limonene, a compound found in lemon oil, does have anti-cancer properties.[32][33]

Another study used pulp from mandarins that contained the plant compounds beta-cryptoxanthin and hesperidin, which are both also found in lemons.The study found that the compounds prevented malignant tumors from developing in the tongues, lungs, and colons of rodents.[34] However, it should be noted that the research team used a very potent dose of the chemicals — far more than anyone would get by eating lemons or oranges.[34]

So far, it seems that plant compounds from lemons and other citrus fruits have the potential to prevent the progression of cancer. That being said, no quality evidence shows that lemons can fight cancer in humans.[22][23]

Lemon and Obesity

A few studies suggest that the plant compounds in lemons may help with weight loss. The researchers found that lemon polyphenols can suppress both body weight gain and body fat accumulation in experimental animals.[35][36] In one study, mice on a fattening diet were given lemon polyphenols extracted from the peel. They gained less weight and less body fat than other mice.[37]

These are interesting findings. However, at the moment, no studies have confirmed the weight loss effects of lemon compounds in humans.[18]


REFERENCES

  1. http://healthylifestar.com/believe-not-use-frozen-lemons-say-goodbye-diabetes-tumors-overweight/#respond
  2. http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/19748198
  3. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0731708509004816?via%3Dihub
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4127821/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25272572
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3203913/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2581754/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14972061
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452714/
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26778708
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9518163?dopt=Abstract
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9654218?dopt=Abstract
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22198281?dopt=Abstract
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18344197?dopt=Abstract
  15. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/10/2499.abstract?ijkey=a401929147f66ddab46e968d20dcfcb4c9868c80&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15540607?dopt=Abstract
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20558145?dopt=Abstract
  18. 18.0 18.1 http://advances.nutrition.org/content/5/4/404.full
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18373174
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18824947
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16215863/
  22. 22.0 22.1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25461441
  23. 23.0 23.1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19573981/
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11130620/
  25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952186/
  26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23117440
  27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22056335
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26705419
  29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25514618
  30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22524801
  31. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24782614
  32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8237062
  33. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10082788
  34. 34.0 34.1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22174562
  35. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19015756
  36. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25022990
  37. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2581754/

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