Claim that Drinking this Juice will Regulate Your Thyroid and Fight Inflammation

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WHAT IS THE TRENDING NEWS STORY

Drink This Juice to Lose Weight, Regulate Your Thyroid and Fight Inflammation

A beverage made from combining dry ginger, nutmeg, Ceylon cinnamon, cranberry juice, orange juice, and lemon juice is claimed to be extremely beneficial, and can provide many health benefits such as weight loss, maintaining thyroid gland functioning, and acting as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant.

WHY THE STORY HAS MISINFORMATION

The article in question claims that the mentioned natural products will aid in losing weight and also help keep the thyroid gland healthy, amongst others. The issue though is the fact that there are no references to any scientific journals, that make recommendations based on evidence, regarding the mentioned benefits of these natural ingredients. The only source to this article is another similar blog entry which is far from being regarded as a credible source of scientific information.

A study in the International Journal of Ayurveda Research presented a patient who developed subacute thyroiditis (where antibodies were formed that attacked the normal thyroid gland tissue) as a result of ginger consumption.[1] Researchers postulated that the cause of the thyroid pathology may have come on as a result of the patient’s immune system triggering a release of antibodies in response to the ginger, and these proteins then started to attack the thyroid follicular cells. Since this was an isolated case, further research in a larger study group is warranted to confirm this possibility.

Very little definitive information is found regarding the mentioned benefits of the natural products in question, with the majority of information being related to the possible anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of these ingredients. Therefore, it needs to be mentioned that there is no solid proof that these natural products possess positive health benefits regarding weight loss and maintenance of the thyroid gland.  

To provide an example; cranberry, orange and lemon juices are all excellent sources of vitamin C as they contain 12mg or more of the vitamin per 100 grams of the fruit.[2] Vitamin C has been shown to aid in the removal of free radicals in the body, which accounts for its function as a potent anti-oxidant. This water-soluble vitamin cannot be manufactured by the body, so it must be supplied in the diet.[3] Free radicals are made when your body breaks down food or when you are exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation. The build-up of free radicals over time is largely responsible for the aging process. Free radicals cause damage to the healthy cells in the body which is detrimental to one’s health because they speed up organ dysfunction, and may play a role in cancer, heart disease, and conditions like arthritis.[4] In terms of the thyroid gland, both hyperthyroidism (over-active thyroid) and hypothyroidism (under-active thyroid) are associated with increased oxidative stress on the body resulting in the release of health-limiting anti-oxidants.[5] It seems therefore that consuming vitamin C containing juices can help reduce the amount of tissue-damaging free radicals in the body, resulting in improvement of one’s health status. The problem with this assertion though is that there is no mention of specific dosages of the natural products, which causes a major problem in determining a dose-dependent effect that will be beneficial for specific individuals.  

The general consensus regarding the efficacy of natural ingredients, in managing conditions and illnesses that affect the human body, is that further research is mandated in order to substantiate the clinical effects of these natural products in the doses at which they are being consumed.[6]

REFERENCES

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2876930/#CIT7
  2. http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/vitamin-c-in-fruits-and-vegetables
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10217058
  4. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002404.htm
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12521231/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23190501

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