Arizona State University(Data Science Program)

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ASU’s nine-month program focuses on using analytics in day-to-day business processes and managing it effectively. Required courses include data mining, applied regression models, analytical decision making tools and business analytics strategy. The curriculum also includes internship opportunities and a capstone practicum project with local Arizona companies such as American Express and Intel. 30 credit hours.

History

1930–1989

In 1933, Grady Gammage, then-president of Arizona State Teachers College at Flagstaff, became president of then–Arizona State Teachers College at Tempe, beginning a tenure that would last for nearly 28 years. Like President Matthews before him, Gammage oversaw construction of a number of buildings on the Tempe campus. He also guided the development of the university's graduate programs. The school's name was changed to Arizona State College in 1945, and finally to Arizona State University in 1958. At the time, two other names considered were Tempe University and State University at Tempe.[30] Among Gammage's greatest achievements in Tempe was the Frankl Lloyd Wright-designed construction of what is today Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium/ASU Gammage, the university's hallmark building, which was completed in 1964, five years after the president's death. Gammage was succeeded by Harold D. Richardson, who served as acting president for nine months before the appointment of the university's 11th president, G. Homer Durham.

By the 1960s, with the presidency of Durham, the university began to expand its academic curriculum by establishing several new colleges and beginning to award Doctor of Philosophy and other doctoral degrees.[31] By the end of his nine-year tenure, ASU had more than doubled enrollment, reporting 23,000 in 1969.

The next three presidents — Harry K. Newburn (1969–71), John W. Schwada (1971–81) and J. Russell Nelson (1981–89), including and Interim President Richard Peck (1989), led the university to increased academic stature, the establishment of the ASU West campus in 1984 and its subsequent construction in 1986, a focus on computer-assisted learning and research, and rising enrollment.

1990–present

Under the leadership of Lattie F. Coor, president from 1990 to 2002, ASU grew through the creation of the Polytechnic campus and extended education sites. Increased commitment to diversity, quality in undergraduate education, research, and economic development occurred over his 12-year tenure. Part of Coor's legacy to the university was a successful fundraising campaign: through private donations, more than $500 million was invested in areas that would significantly impact the future of ASU. Among the campaign's achievements were the naming and endowing of Barrett, The Honors College, and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts; the creation of many new endowed faculty positions; and hundreds of new scholarships and fellowships.[32]

In 2002, Michael M. Crow became the university's 16th president. At his inauguration, he outlined his vision for transforming ASU into a "New American University"[33]—one that would be open and inclusive, and set a goal for the university to meet Association of American Universities criteria and to become a member.[11] Crow initiated the idea of transforming ASU into "One university in many places"—a single institution comprising several campuses, sharing students, faculty, staff and accreditation. Subsequent reorganizations[34] combined academic departments, consolidated colleges and schools, and reduced staff and administration as the university expanded its West and Polytechnic campuses. ASU's Downtown Phoenix campus was also expanded, with several colleges and schools relocating there. The university established learning centers throughout the state, including the ASU Colleges at Lake Havasu City and programs in Thatcher, Yuma, and Tucson. Students at these centers can choose from several ASU degree and certificate programs.

During Crow’s tenure, and aided by hundreds of millions of dollars in donations, ASU began a years-long research facility capital building effort, resulting in the establishment of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, and several large interdisciplinary research buildings. Along with the research facilities, the university faculty was expanded, including the addition of four Nobel Laureates.[35][36] Since 2002 the university's research expenditures have tripled and more than 1.5 million square feet of space has been added to the university's research facilities.[37]

The economic downturn that began in 2008 took a particularly hard toll on Arizona, resulting in large cuts to ASU's budget. In response to these cuts, ASU capped enrollment, closed down about four dozen academic programs, combined academic departments, consolidated colleges and schools, and reduced university faculty, staff and administrators;[38][39] however, with an economic recovery underway in 2011, the university continued its campaign to expand the West and Polytechnic Campuses,[40] and establishing a set of low-cost, teaching-focused extension campuses in Lake Havasu City and Payson, Arizona.[41][42]

In 2015, the existing Thunderbird School of Global Management became the fifth ASU campus, as the Thunderbird School of Global Management at ASU. Partnerships for education and research with Mayo Clinic established collaborative degree programs in health care and law, and shared administrator positions, laboratories and classes at the Mayo Clinic Arizona campus.

The Arizona Center for Law and Society, the new home of ASU’s Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, will open in fall 2016 on the Downtown Phoenix campus, relocating faculty and students from the Tempe campus to the state capital.[43]

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