International Conference on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety

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Pharmacovigilance is the science and exercises identifying with the discovery, evaluation, comprehension and counteractive action of unfavorable impacts or some other pharmaceutical related issue. Pharmacovigilance underpins general wellbeing programs by giving solid data to the productive evaluation of the hazard advantage profile of solutions, add to the appraisal of formal, uses, symptoms, damage, viability and danger of pharmaceuticals, empowering the sheltered, sound and more viable utilization of different medications. Advance instruction, understanding and clinical preparing in Pharmacovigilance and its successful accessibility to people in general.

  • Postmarketing Drug Safety
  • Signal Detection in Drug Safety
  • Consulting on Risk Management
  • Adverse Event Reporting
Wizard photo International Conference on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety 1.jpg
International Conference on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety
Date May 10-11, 2018
Place Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The main aim of pharmacovigilance is to provide complete and clear information related to drug safety and the various risks and benefits associated with them. Pharmacovigilance is defined as the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem. Pharmacovigilance can help in providing information about unintended and severe adverse events which could not be provided by clinical trials involving in-vivo method. It enhances the impact of pharmacovigilance on patient welfare and public health and to know what is pharmacovigilance. This track gives a brief discussion on Pharmacovigilance role in the healthcare system. Pharmacovigilance legislation gives an outlook on the rules and laws to follow in Pharmacovigilance practice. The Role of pharma industries in the improvement of the Pharmacovigilance system is very crucial to maintain the safety data, detection and evaluation of drug safety signals through manual and medical devices reporting. Pharmacovigilance scope also deals as Ecopharmacovigilance (EPV), pharmacoenvironmentology and pharmacovigilance in herbal medicines.

  • Significance of pharmacovigilance
  • Pharmacovigilance and healthcare system
  • Pharmacovigilance legislation
  • Role of pharma industries in the improvement of the pharmacovigilance system
  • Detection and evaluation of drug safety signals through manual and medical devices reporting
  • Methods of pharmacovigilance

ICPDS 2018: 20th International Conference on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety

Conference Aims and Objectives

Conference series and its subsidiaries including iMedPub LLC and Conference Series Organise 3000+ Conferences across the USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members. conference series is an amalgamation of Open Access Publications and worldwide international science conferences and events.

The 'ICPDS 2018: 20th International Conference on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of pharmacovigilance and drug safety. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety.

Conference Series LLC warmly invites all the participants across the world to “12th Global Pharmacovigilance & Clinical Trail Summit” scheduled on July 16-17, 2018 in Sydney, Australia. Session discussions focus on discussions about approaches and innovations for Patient Benefit Risk Management in Pharma, Biotech and Healthcare Industry. This conference provides a forum for interaction among attendees with the discussion involving discovery of a new drug, Challenges in drug development, Pre-Clinical and Clinical trial reports, Case Studies, Pharmacovigilance, Biosimilar and Biologistics and its eye on new drug regulatory approvals.

Adverse drug reactions experienced with use of a medicinal product may result in significant morbidity and mortality. The ultimate goal of pharmacovigilance is to ensure safe use of medicines, minimizing the risks related to the medicinal product and maximizing the benefits. During development of a medicinal product, it undergoes animal testing and establishing its safety and efficacy in humans before permission to market is granted. However, clinical trials are conducted on a small number of patients, ranging to a few thousand, and excluding special populations, e.g., children, pregnant and lactating women, and geriatric patients. Data generated during clinical trials will provide information about the common adverse events but more rare adverse events may not be encountered. Therefore, it is important to monitor safety during the post approval period and throughout the entire life cycle of the medicinal product to arrive at the actual risk-benefit profile of the medicinal product and take necessary measures to minimize risks. In addition to analyzing individual case safety reports and aggregate reports, risk management is undertaken by data mining pharmacovigilance safety databases, signal detection, and by implementing risk management programs.

Aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety.

This is a 2-day Mega Event offering Exhibition, at the venue to showcase the new and emerging technologies with Keynote presentation, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.

Conferences like this are one of the good ways to address the need or up to date and accurate information on the constantly changing Pharmacovigilance guidelines. The proceedings of the conference will bring concrete answers and insights from different stakeholders. Pharmacoviligance professional must always ensure to stay on top of the dynamic guidelines of the Pharmacovigilance landscape.

All honorable authors are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts, papers and e-posters. Also, high-quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. The conference solicits contributions of abstracts, papers and e-posters that address themes and topics of the conference, including figures, tables and references of novel research materials. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety.

The 11th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety was during June 21-22, 2018 in London, UK. It focuses on the advancements in Pharmacovigilance, Risk Management and Drug Safety.

The field of Pharmacovigilance is growing rapidly and its development is making tremendous impacts in medical sciences and pharmaceuticals. The 11th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety emphasizes on how the importance and significance can be gauged by the fact that it has made huge advancements over the course of time and is continuing to influence various sectors. The target audience for this medical event ranges from leading Pharmaceutical industries Involved in Pharmacovigilance, drug safety, clinical trials, contract research organizations, research institutes, patent and law firms, domestic and international regulatory agencies and executive directors of leading Bio-pharmaceutical ,Pharmaceutical and Biotech companies and experts and others engaged in endeavors related to Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety research and business and Drug regulatory experts such as those who supervise the compliance of applicants with their Pharmacovigilance activities and facilitate Pharmacovigilance activities in their territory and also those who proactively review medicinal product safety and capture data related to cohort event monitoring which is linked to a particular healthcare investment or initiatives like health care programs initiated by WHO and other non-governmental organizations and charities.

9th Conference on Pharmacology September 04-06, 2017 Paris, France; 3rd Clinical Trials Conference September 20-21, 2017 Dublin, Ireland; 9th Conference on Pharmaceutical Chemical Analysis October 02-03, 2017 Vienna, Austria; 5th Conference on Pain Research and Management October 05-06, 2017 London, UK; Conference On Pharmaceutical Biotechnology December 07-09, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 12th Conference on Pharmaceutical Sciences in Pharma Industry February 26-27, 2018 London, UK; 16th Conference On Drug Delivery Systems March 19-21, 2018 Berlin, Germany; 11th European Biosimilars Conference April 26-27, 2018 Rome, Italy; 10th Pharma Conference May 07-09, 2018 at Frankfurt, Germany; 4th Conference On Natural Products June 11-13, 2018 Rome, Italy

About the Conference

Conference Series is organizing splendorous Pharmaceutical conferences welcomes you to attend the 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety to be held during July 04-05, 2019 in Valencia, Spain. It focuses on the advancements in Pharmacovigilance, Risk Management, and Drug Safety.

The field of Pharmacovigilance is growing rapidly and its development is making tremendous impacts in medical sciences and pharmaceuticals. 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety emphasizes on how the importance and significance can be gauged by the fact that it has made huge advancements over the course of time and is continuing to influence various sectors. 

Why attend???

With members from around the world focused on learning about Pharmacovigilance and its advances; this is your best opportunity to reach the largest assemblage of participants from the Pharmacovigilance community. Conduct presentations, distribute information, meet with current and potential scientists, make a splash with new drug developments, and receive named recognition at this 2-days event. World-Renowned Speakers, the most recent techniques, developments, and the newest updates in Pharmacovigilance are Hallmarks of this Conference. This track gives a brief discussion on Pharmacovigilance role in the healthcare system. Pharmacovigilance legislation gives an outlook on the rules and laws to follow in Pharmacovigilance practice.

Target Audience:

  • Pharmacovigilance Students, Scientists
  • Pharmacovigilance Researchers
  • Pharmacovigilance Faculty
  • Medical Colleges
  • Pharmacovigilance Associations and Societies
  • Business Entrepreneurs
  • Training Institutes
  • Software Developing Companies
  • Manufacturing Medical Devices Companies
  • Data Management Companies

Journal of Pharmacovigilance | International Journal of Pharmacovigilance | The International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine | Pharmacovigilance | Pharmacoepidemiology | Trials Journal | Clinical Research Journals | Journal of Clinical Trials | International Journal of Clinical Trials | American Journal of Clinical Trials | International Journal of Medical | Clinical Research, Journal of Pharmacology | Clinical Research | Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Trials | Advances in Pharmacoepidemiology | Drug Safety | Drug Safety Journal | International Journal of Drug Safety | Drug Discovery | Journal of Drug Safety | Journal of Clinical Case Reports, Indian Journal of Case Reports | American Journal of Case Reports.

Related Associations or Societies:

Societies in USA: International Society of Pharmacovigilance | Drug Safety & Pharmacovigilance | Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) | American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists | Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry | the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA) | Society for Clinical Trials (SCT) | Canadian Association of Professionals in Regulatory Affairs | Clinical Research Society (CRS)

Societies in Europe:  European Association for Clinical Pharmacology (EACPT) | International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISOP) | European Medicines Agency, Pharmaceutical Information and Pharmacovigilance Association (PIPA) | Association of CROs Czech Republic (ACRO-CZ) | European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) | European Society for Clinical Investigation (ESCI).

Societies in Asia and Pacific: Society of Pharmacovigilance, International Society of Pharmacovigilance: (ISOP) | Indian Society for Clinical Organization Research (ISCR) | Indian Society for Clinical Research | Clinical Trials Society | Society for Clinical Trials Association of Clinical Research | The Society of Clinical Research Associates | Association of Clinical Research Organization | Clinical Research Society | Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) | Japan CRO Association (JCROA) | Pan-Asian Clinical Research Association (PACRA) | Central Society for Clinical and Translational Research (CSCTR)

Sessions/Tracks

Track 1: Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

Clinical trials allow the drug to be tested for safety by different ethnic population. Due to the higher medical needs and increasing disease prevalence, developing countries are becoming a hub for clinical trial execution. The clinical trials market has been estimated to reach USD 14.2 billion in 2016 and is projected to reach around USD 22 billion by the year 2021, and the annual growth rate of (7.5%). There are additionally numerous clinical trials started by scholarly clinical scientists. Whether started by industry or by scholastic clinical examiners and research is frequently performed in national, European and overall consortia, which can be expansive ones. Clinical research brings up moral and security issues. Clinical research is exceedingly controlled. To encourage and coordinated efforts crosswise over fringes.

Related Conferences:

Pharmacovigilance Conferences | Global Pharmacovigilance Conferences | Clinical Trials Conference | Drug Safety Conference | Clinical Case Reports Conferences | Case reports Conference | Clinical development Conferences | Drug Research Conferences | Good clinical practice Conferences | Good pharmacovigilance practices Conferences | Pharmacovigilance and Risk Management Conferences | Risk Management Conferences | Regulatory Affairs Conferences.

19th  World Congress on Pharmaceutical Sciences & Innovations in Pharma Industry February 25- 26, 2019 Berlin, Germany; 4th Conference on Antibiotics Conference; June 14-15, 2019, Barcelona, Spain; 13th European Pharma Conferences May 07-09, 2019 at Frankfurt, Germany; 5th International Conference on Advanced Clinical Research and Clinical Trials, September 10-11, 2018 at Zurich, Switzerland; 12th  European Biosimilars Congress, April 15-16, 2019 Berlin, Germany; 21st Annual European Pharma Congress May 20-21, 2019 Zurich, Switzerland;  4th International Conference on Drug Discovery and Advanced Drug Delivery Systems & Technologies, October 18-19, 2018 at Warsaw, Poland; 18th Annual Pharmaceutical Chemical Analysis Congress, November 05-06, 2018 at Madrid, Spain; 9th Global Experts Meeting on Neuropharmacology, November 15-16, 2018 at Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd International Conference on Generics Drugs and Biosimilars, November 15-17, 2018 at Frankfurt, Germany; Exhibition, December 02-06 2018 at Anaheim, USA; 78th Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, September 02-06, 2018 at Glassglow, UK; 14th Nanomedicine and Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Conferences, April 09-11, 2019, London, UK.

Pharmacovigilance in International Health

Pharmacovigilance is an activity that has international significance. The current global network of pharmacovigilance centres, coordinated by the Uppsala Monitoring Center, would be strengthened by an independent system of review. This would consider contentious and important drug safety issues that have the potential to affect public health adversely beyond national boundaries.

The Erice Declaration provides a framework of values and practice for collection, analysis and subsequent communication of drug safety issues. In providing for this, it asserts scientific and clinical issues on the one hand and the right of the public to be openly and fully informed on the other. It is a process that requires the active commitment of all involved - regulators, policymakers, health personnel, journalists, and (not least) pharmaceutical manufacturers. Scrupulous attention is required in the practice of pharmacovigilance to the issues of patient confidentiality.


Introduction

Until recently, pharmacovigilance has been confined mainly to detection of adverse drug events that were previously either unknown or poorly understood. Its particular purpose was to contribute to a scientific understanding of the safety profile of a rather small number of drugs and to advise national regulatory authorities. In this document, it is proposed that pharmacovigilance has the potential to move beyond its previously rather confined limits and to serve a higher priority within public health. How that might happen is the subject of this chapter.

The burden of ADRs on public health

Despite the progress in pharmacovigilance that has been made, the burden on public health of ADRs remains significant. (60) Pharmacoeconomic studies on the costs of adverse reactions suggest that governments pay considerable amounts from health budgets towards covering costs associated with them. (70) In most countries, the extent of this expenditure has not been measured.

The relationship between drug utilization patterns and the frequency of ADRs is poorly understood. However, it has become increasingly clear that the safety profile of medicines is directly linked with socio-political, economic and cultural factors that in turn affect access to medicines, their utilization patterns and public perceptions of them. (71, 72)

Adverse drug reactions can be considered a form of toxicity or enhanced drug effects that occur during appropriate use (eg, when drug metabolism is temporarily inhibited by a disorder or another drug). In the US, 3 to 7% of all hospitalizations are due to adverse drug reactions. ADRs occur during 10 to 20% of hospitalizations; about 10 to 20% of these ADRs are severe. The incidence of death due to ADRs is unknown; suggested rates of 0.5 to 0.9% may be falsely high because many of the patients included had serious and complex disorders. Incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions vary by patient characteristics (eg, age, sex, ethnicity, coexisting disorders, genetic or geographic factors) and by drug factors (eg, type of drug, administration route, treatment duration, dosage, and bio availability). Incidence is higher with advanced age and polypharmacy.

Drug utilization

Drug utilization patterns are a major determinant in drug safety. For instance, the use of injectable medicines is more common in developing countries. (73) The parenteral route is likely to be associated with a high risk of adverse effects when injections are administered by inadequately sterilized equipment or poorly trained personnel. It is estimated that unsafe injection practice may lead to 780,000 to 1.56 million cases of hepatitis B, 250,000 to 500,000 cases of hepatitis C and 50,000 to 100,000 cases of HIV, annually in Africa. (74)

Self-medication and the lack of regulatory control measures over the sale of drugs further increase the risk of adverse reactions. The number of drugs in each prescription is highest in developing countries. (73) Factors such as illiteracy, concomitant use of traditional medicines, and the continued availability of impure and irrational pharmaceutical preparations contribute further to the risk.

Sound drug legislation, policy and an essential drugs programme that includes education of health professionals and patients in rational use of medicines are measures that should ensure better health care in all countries. Pharmacovigilance programmes could learn from the social mobilization practices that have been introduced in programmes for injection safety during immunization. (74) Social mobilization includes the three-pronged approach of:

• increasing public awareness, • ensuring advocacy for decision-makers, and • sensitization of health workers.


This encourages a consumer-based demand for safe medicines from a public that is informed about the safety profile of the medicines they use. The incorporation of pharmacovigilance into these activities should ensure that such measures are relevant locally and that they promote public confidence in the process.

A partnership with patients

The ready availability of safer and more effective medicines of good quality inspires confidence and trust among patients. Pharmacovigilance is an essential part of the public programmes that underpin the reliable availability of sound medicines and it needs to be understood, supported and promoted at the highest levels.

To achieve this, it is necessary for information about drug safety programmes to be easily available to the public so that the central role of the patient in the rational and safe use of medicines is understood. The public has in recent years increasingly influenced health professionals’ prescribing and patterns of drug use. This influence and greater awareness on the part of the public is attributable in part to the role of the media and the Internet. High expectations of all service providers and medical institutions have developed.

Available information is not always reliable or scientifically valid. Direct advertising to the consumer of prescription medicines has become commonplace in many countries. With this information, patients feel more able to make their own therapeutic decisions, without assistance from the doctor or pharmacist. The result has been increasing self-medication, licit and illicit sale of medicines over the Internet, and over-prescribing by doctors on patients’ demand. This has had a considerable effect on increased prescribing. (75, 76)

If variations in the way medicines are used to alter their safety profile, then there is a need for research to be conducted into how the process works. It also needs to be determined how access to drug information might influence patient safety, including patients’ perception of safety and the level of harm they are prepared to accept for different medicines. The social and cultural aspects of pharmaceutical use and the expectations and concerns of patients need to be further studied. The outcome of such research should make possible a better formulation of policies with a view to reducing patient risk. (77)

Public health programmes and responsible media coverage aimed at increasing access to drug information have made it possible for patients in many countries to take greater responsibility for their own health and for the decisions they make, and in the wider involvement of patients in decisions. This is reflected, in the creation of patient charters and patients’ bills of rights,(75) and in the work of patient advocacy groups. For example, patients with HIV/AIDS have been instrumental in creating international awareness of the impact of the disease and in improving access to therapies and communication of the associated risks. It is a welcome development in some places that patients’ concerns are now recognized as having a legitimate part to play at the heart of the decision-making process.

Such public health programmes, however, need not focus only on patients but could be used for the benefit of the general public as well. Such awareness-building and educational initiatives should also include children and elderly populations and could be greatly facilitated through partnerships with the media, educational institutions, other governmental and non-governmental organizations.

The Erice Declaration

The Erice Declaration (1997) represented significant progress in light of these changes. (5) The Declaration challenges all the players:

• public health administration • health professionals • the pharmaceutical industry • government • drug regulators • the media • consumers


to strive towards the highest ethical, professional and scientific standards in protecting and promoting safe use of medicines. The Declaration urges governments and others involved in determining policies relating to the benefit, harm, effectiveness and risk of medicines to account for what they communicate to the public and patients. It calls for honesty when communicating drug safety information, even when such information may be incomplete and investigations still underway. It further asks that patients be openly informed of the facts, assumptions and uncertainties of the safety profiles of the medicines they use.

Some efforts have been made subsequently to achieve the goals formulated at Erice. Many regulatory agencies have websites to keep the public informed of their regulatory decisions and of drug safety concerns. In the Philippines and Australia videos and television programmes on ADRs are used to encourage reporting. Newsletters, bulletins and electronic distribution lists are increasingly used to communicate safety information globally. The WHO has made considerable efforts to train drug regulators and national immunization staff in communicating information to the media on adverse effects following immunization.c

Details on the training in vaccines safety can be viewed at the following website: http://www.who.int/vaccines-access/Vaccines/VaccineQuality/GTN/aefi.htm


There are, however, several challenges facing pharmacovigilance programmes in achieving the aspirations of the Erice Declaration. These include the following:

(i) The difficulties and risks in communicating conflicting or contentious messages to the public. For instance, during the course of immunization programmes, communication of new safety concerns associated with the vaccine(s), or with programmatic errors, may result in a dramatic fall in coverage. Nonetheless, an approach of secrecy in such circumstances is likely to erode public trust and confidence, and it fails to respect the rights of the public to participate in decision-making. Not only do facts and figures need to be shared with the public, but also the process by which the data is assessed and how decisions are made should be shared openly.

(ii) Communication between national drug regulatory authorities and national pharmacovigilance centers needs to be improved so that regulatory decisions with possible international implications are rapidly communicated to regulators, to avoid widespread public concern or panic.


The pharmaceutical industry shares responsibility for sound communication with the public and health professionals for drug safety issues. This would be helped if manufacturers were routinely to communicate new safety information to regulators and pharmacovigilance centers in all countries where the drug concerned is marketed.

Regulators and manufacturers should have mutually agreed to procedures for managing a crisis and for dealing with any new safety information. Manufacturer and regulator need to have an established common view and be in agreement as to what they regard as a new safety concern and what constitutes a crisis so that problems of miscommunication and lack of trust are minimized when crises do arise.

A critical link in the chain of drug safety crisis management is the knowledge, competence and approach of journalists. They depend, for balanced reporting, on an understanding of how drugs work, of benefit, harm, effectiveness and risk, and on being able to distinguish between relative and absolute risk. That requires an astute and thoughtful briefing from the responsible reporting official in the ministry of health or drug regulatory authority and ability and understanding on the part of health reporters. A platform that encourages debate and discussion between regulators, manufacturers, consumers and the media would do much towards achieving these objectives. This applies as much to investigations in progress as it does to the conclusions that are reached.

The real cost, time, skills and human resources necessary to communicate drug safety issues pro-actively to the media, the public and health professionals need to be carefully considered. Such planning and resources need to be given a higher priority than in the past. Local issues such as culture, literacy and the socio-economic status of the population at risk may have bearing on the way the message is presented. Communication of information must ensure that participants’ rights to confidentiality are protected.

The costs to society of drug-related problems

When considering the cost of disease to society, ADRs and what is spent on detecting, preventing and managing them need to be included in the analysis. As pharmaceuticals become an increasingly prominent item in health budgets, and reliance is increasingly placed on physicians for controlling costs and curtailing their prescribing practices, pharmacovigilance has a growing importance in addressing health costs. The management of HIV/AIDS in developing countries is illustrative of these issues. Within the debate over drug prices and intellectual property rights, there are in addition important concerns regarding the widespread use of potentially toxic medicines in developing countries with poor resources. Antiretroviral treatment regimens commonly involve two or three potentially toxic agents. Monitoring safety and efficacy in this situation involves regular laboratory testing of liver function, hematology, viral resistance by CD4 cell count and viral load. Furthermore, treatment of the serious and not uncommon adverse effects of such treatment, which include dermatological, hepatic, hematological, metabolic and neurological disturbances, adds even further to the health budget.

Pharmacovigilance activities are expanding around the world. This is reflected in the increasing number of national pharmacovigilance centers that have been established in recent years. There are still many countries where no formal systems for pharmacovigilance are in place. To ensure that the existing centers are effective, their impact on public health and health costs should be measurable and the benefits demonstrable. Only then will widespread support and long-term sustainability of pharmacovigilance centers be assured.

Encouraging product stewardship

Product stewardship may be defined as:

• the demonstrable process by which a business can identify and manage its safety, health and environmental performance as applied to the development, manufacture, marketing, use and disposal of its products (including packaging).d

d Modified from: Gibson B, Product Stewardship in the Chemical Industry. ATSE Focus 1997 (98): http://www.atse.org.au/publications/focus/focus-gibson.htm.


The principle requires pharmaceutical manufacturers to assume responsibility for the impact of their activities ‘from cradle to grave’, including consideration of the key influences in regulatory, customer and community contexts. The main underlying concern of the manufacturers is product liability, driven by legislation that requires products to have a safety profile which meets statutory requirements and public expectations. It is aimed at encouraging manufacturers to aspire to a new level of responsibility for the integrity of their products.

Responsibility for their products extends to all manufacturers (including those who produce generic medicines) and suppliers of raw materials. More broadly, the idea of stewardship is applicable to all industries. The principles of stewardship in the pharmaceutical industry include:

• compliance with policies and legislation that would assure patients’ and public confidence in their medicines

• research that is scientifically sound, ethical and safe for trial participants

• determining the impact of the manufacturing process on the safety of a medicine, for the patient and the environment (this includes adhering to principles of conservation and protection of the environment, and to recycling of resources)

• training and education of personnel and of patients in the optimum use of pharmaceutical products

• storage and transport of medicinal products in a way that ensures quality at the time they are used by patients

• safe disposal of waste, raw materials, and of the end-products and their packaging (for example, injections, chemotherapeutic agents)

• rational and appropriate use of medicines by patients and by health professionals, requiring sound drug information, good product information (package insert/data sheet), including information on the benefit, harm, effectiveness and risk, and how the total package of information can be communicated most effectively

• ensuring that sales and marketing observe the highest ethical standards that will instill public trust and confidence.


Adoption of the idea of stewardship would have important implications for the activities of pharmaceutical manufacturers. Many have already partly adopted the principles, but much remains to be done before the industry can be said to subscribe to these standards and comply fully with them. The standards cannot be achieved by industry alone. Sound legislation, a competent national drug regulatory authority, and informed prescribes and consumers are necessary for stewardship to succeed.

Protecting patient confidentiality

When patients are prescribed medicines for the prevention or cure of disease they have a right, of which they should be informed, to decide whether or not to accept what is offered. They are also entitled to confidentiality. Physicians have a duty to protect that right and to use information from treatment only in relation to that patient’s care unless they are expressly allowed otherwise by prior informed consent.

These rights and duties are not absolute. In some instances, the needs of public health may override those of the individual patient for protection of confidentiality. Public health requirements such as mandatory notification of certain diseases may justify disclosure of patient information. But even when such disclosure is required in terms of public health need, it remains the responsibility of the health worker to protect patient confidentiality as far as possible.

In most countries, the law does not require that ADRs should be reported, and National Centers in those circumstances do not have the legal protection afforded where there are mandatory reporting systems. It is essential that healthcare personnel should obtain the consent of the patient when identity is disclosed on an ADR form or in a drug surveillance study.

It is ultimately in the patient’s interest that healthcare personnel should have access to good information from other patients who have been exposed to the drug. Only by encouraging reporting can regulatory agencies and manufacturers take responsibility for the safety, efficacy and quality of the drugs they have approved or marketed for public consumption.

National Centers have to maintain high standards of data protection when information has been received on patients who have not given their informed consent. Patients should also be helped to understand that the information they provide is likely to contribute to an international understanding of drug safety. (78)

The international response to drug safety issues

Certain safety issues are likely to have a global impact with possibly serious consequences for public health. When this happens, a cohesive international assessment and response are needed. (79) Such a system would need to be supported by member countries. Its terms of reference should be quite clear and generally agreed. There would need to be accessible to all data relating to a product under consideration, including product information protected by secrecy laws and patient case records when necessary.

The aggressive marketing of new medicines by pharmaceutical manufacturers and the resultant rapid exposure over a short period of time of large numbers of patients to them warrant the creation of a system for global assessment of drug safety concerns. The WHO has supported the creation of an independent advisory panel composed of a broad spectrum of medical disciplines including clinical pharmacologists, regulators, academics and epidemiologists. The functions of this panel will be to provide advice to WHO on safety issues relating to medicinal products, including its Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring (the UMC) and through it to the Member States of WHO.

Considerations for the future For all medicines, there is a trade-off between the benefits and the potential for harm. To minimize the harm, it is necessary that medicines of good quality, safety and efficacy are used rationally, and that the expectations and concerns of the patient are taken into account when therapeutic decisions are made. To achieve this is to serve public health, and to foster a sense of trust in patients in the medicines they use that would extend to confidence in the health service in general.

The discipline of pharmacovigilance has developed considerably since the 1972 WHO technical report, and it remains a dynamic clinical and scientific discipline. It has been essential to meet the challenges of the increasing range and potency of medicines (including vaccines), which carry with them an inevitable and sometimes unpredictable potential for harm.

The risk of harm, however, is less when medicines are used by an informed health profession and by patients who themselves understand and share responsibility for their drugs. When adverse effects and toxicity appear - particularly when previously unknown in association with the medicine - it is essential that they should be analysed and communicated effectively to an audience that has the knowledge to interpret the information. This is the role of pharmacovigilance. Much has already been achieved.

Addressing the Challenges of Quality Assurance in Clinical Research

Developing new medicines is an increasingly complex and costly process involving many people and significant investment. Advances in technology and risk management methodology provide opportunities to address these challenges by increasing efficiency and focusing efforts where they matter most. To help sponsors keep up with these challenges and advances, and enhance industry practices, the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) released an amended version of their guidelines for Good Clinical Practice (GCP): ICH GCP E6 (R2); which focuses on delivering better quality and recognizing the benefits of integrated quality risk management (IQRM).

Our IQRM methodology takes a risk proportionate, data-driven approach to the design, execution, and oversight of our customers’ clinical trials. We embed this into our Trusted Process® and fully align with the ICH E6 (R2) GCP Addendum and the principles of the Transcelerate consortium.

Our IQRM process is an evolution of our project management processes, focused on managing risks to quality. It begins during the RFP evaluation process and continues through the Clinical Study Report (CSR) development. This provides reassurance that we continuously monitor identified risks to quality.

Our collaborative approach begins when we receive the RFP; we engage with you as soon as possible to:

  • Identify any elements within the protocol which may add complexity and/or be a barrier to its operational feasibility
  • Fully understand the data and processes within your trial design which are critical to subject rights, safety and the reliability of trial results
  • Identify any risks to quality and their impact on the identified critical data and processes
  • Develop the monitoring strategy, based on the defined critical data, processes and risks
  • Agree on which systems and technologies to employ to ensure comprehensive oversight and reporting

The result is a thoughtful, risk-proportionate monitoring strategy focused on activities essential to protecting subjects and ensuring the reliability of your trial data. Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance are there throughout every step of the drug development, but there is so few information with the basic fundamentals available to help new people within drug safety or anyone who has the interest to want to learn the basics.

One of the reasons for good clinical practice (GCP) is to protect the subjects in a research trial. In all research, the subjects’ well-being should be paramount Safety checks, procedures, and reporting are fundamental to any research study involving human subjects. This includes the timely detection and management of, adverse events (AE), serious adverse events (SAE), adverse reactions (AR), and suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSAR). In addition, excellent record keeping, follow-up, and reporting are essential so that appropriate decisions can be taken relating to study participants as well those which help steer the course of the study, based on emerging safety information. One of the most important aspects of clinical research is ensuring the safety of new drugs, treatments, etc on patients. This is called pharmacovigilance or drug safety compliance. This safety aspect is monitored, implemented, and complied with in two ways. Firstly, the sponsor of the clinical research, usually a pharmaceutical organization, conducts drug safety tests at all the stages of the clinical trials they conduct wherever it is required by law. They also implement drug safety protocols at stages of the clinical research study voluntarily too. The other way in which pharmacovigilance compliance is ensured is by the laws and guidelines given by the regulatory authorities like the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in the US. The 15th International Scientific Days 2018 Conference aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Agricultural Economics and Management. It also provides an interdisciplinary platform for policy makers, top managers, researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Agricultural Economics. Themes for the conference have revolved around the linkages between Domestic Policy Reform, Trade Liberalisation, Economic growth, Poverty Reduction, Climate Change, Sustainable Development, Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Education for Agribusiness. 13th Global Pharmacovigilance & Clinical Trials Summit March 28-29, 2019 Osaka, Japan Theme: Promulgating the prevention of adverse drug reaction Conference Series LLC Ltd is arranging a splendorous Pharmaceutical gathering invites you to go to the International Conference and Exhibition on Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance to be held amid August 29-30, 2018 in Toronto, Canada. It concentrates on the headway in Risk Management, Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance.

The field of Pharmacovigilance is developing quickly and its advancement is having colossal effects in restorative sciences and pharmaceuticals. International Conference and Exhibition on Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance underline on how the significance and noteworthiness can be gauged by the way that it has made tremendous progressions throughout time and is proceeding to impact on different areas. The pharmacovigilance is related to the collection, detection, assessment, monitoring, and prevention of adverse effects with pharmaceutical products, and it is needed in different stages of product life cycle, and the safety surveillance and risk management. Information received from patients and healthcare providers via pharmacovigilance agreements, plays a critical role in providing the data necessary for Pharmacovigilance to take place, in order to market or to test a pharmaceutical product, adverse event data must be submitted to the local drug regulatory authority. Finally, pharmacovigilance is concerned with identifying the hazards associated with pharmaceutical products and with minimizing the risk of any harm that may come to patients by safety surveillance and risk management

Priorities and needs of PV at different stages of a product life-cycle Challenges and opportunities in PV life cycle management IT solutions for pharmacovigilance Safety surveillance and risk management life cycle Innovations and trends in clinical drug safety

Topic [1]

Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Conference Proceedings: All submitted conference papers will be blind peer reviewed by three competent reviewers. World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET)is a scholarly open science, peer reviewed, interdisciplinary, monthly and fully referred international research journal focusing on theories, methods and applications in Science, Engineering and Technology. WASET is indexed in the International Science Index (ISI), Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, and other index databases.[2] The conference abstracts and proceedings book, CD and certificate of presentation will be distributed to participants at the conference registration desk. Impact Factor Indicators.

Related Associations or Societies:

Society for Clinical Trials (SCT), Association of Clinical Research, The Society of Clinical Research Associates, Association of Clinical Research Organization, Clinical Research Society, Indian Society for Clinical Organization Research (ISCR)

Who to attend???

  • Pharmacovigilance Students, Scientists
  • Pharmacovigilance Researchers & Teachers
  • Medical Colleges
  • Pharmaceutical Industries
  • Pharmacovigilance Associations and Societies
  • Pharmacovigilance Training Institutes
  • Software Developing Companies
  • Medical Devices Manufacturing Companies
  • Data Management Companies
  • Business Entrepreneurs

Also, Directors/Senior Directors/Executive Directors and Vice Presidents/Senior Vice Presidents/Executive Vice Presidents and Heads/Leaders/Partners of:

  • CROs and CMOs
  • Clinical Research Sites
  • Pharma/Biotechnology and Medical Device industries
  • Hospitals, Associations

University Faculties scientists who are related to clinical and medical research like:

  • Directors
  • Senior Professors
  • Assistant Professors
  • Associate Professor
  • Research Scholars
  • PhD Students

Pharmacovigilance (PV) is defined as the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem. WHO established its Programme for International Drug Monitoring in response to the thalidomide disaster detected in 1961. Together with the WHO Collaborating Center for International Drug Monitoring, Uppsala, WHO promotes PV at the country level. At the end of 2010, 134 countries were part of the WHO PV Programme. The aims of PV are to enhance patient care and patient safety in relation to the use of medicines; and to support public health programmes by providing reliable, balanced information for the effective assessment of the risk-benefit profile of medicines.

<ref>http://www.who.int/medicines/areas/quality_safety/safety_efficacy/pharmvigi/en/

Adverse Events & Adverse Reactions The ICH E2A guideline describes Adverse Events as any “untoward medical occurrence” which happens to either a patient or a subject in a clinical investigation when a pharmaceutical product has been given to that person and which does not necessarily have to have a causal relationship with the treatment. This encompasses any signs and symptoms which are unfavorable and unexpected for the patient or subject, including any abnormal laboratory findings. These could be symptoms or a diseases temporally associated with the use of a medicinal product and do not have to have been previously associated with that product. Neither do they have to have a known causal relationship with the course of treatment.

ICH E2A characterizes Adverse Reactions according to the stage of the medicinal product’s life cycle. If the product has not yet been marketed, Adverse Reactions are any “noxious and unintended responses”1 to the product at any dose. The effect of this classification is to reasonably establish that a relationship between the product and the reaction “cannot be ruled out”1. Once the product has been introduced to the market, “Adverse Reactions” encompass responses which are again “noxious and unintended” but occur at the established routine dosages which have been defined for use in humans to prevent, diagnose, or treat disease or modify “physiological function”1. However, some more recent definitions include responses to doses and uses outside those recommended.

Country[1]

Netherlands

Paris

Dublin

Madrid

London

City & Topics [1]

Amsterdam

== Call for Papers [1] ==Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to: Advances/Innovations in pharmacovigilance

QP-PV role and responsibilities

Medication error prevention

Adverse drug reactions/events

Adverse event reporting/monitoring

Benefit-risk assessment

Data mining and statistical analysis

Signal detection and risk management

Pharmacoepidemiology

Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics

Ecopharmacovigilance

Pre-clinical and clinical trials

Clinical drug toxicity and biomarkers

Pharmacovigilance for herbal medicines

International collaboration on pharmacovigilance

Legal and regulatory issues

Related Societies and Associations:

Drug Information Association, International Pharmaceutical Federation, European Drug Utilization Research Group (EURODURG), International Society of Pharmacovigilance , Society for Clinical Trials, Association of Clinical Research, The Society of Clinical Research Associates, Clinical Research Society, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry, Pharmaceutical Information and Pharmacovigilance Association ( PIPA), International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISOP), The Australian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT), European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (EACPT), International Epidemiology Association, European Association of Employed Community Pharmacists in Europe (EPhEU), Association of Pharmacy Professionals (APP)

Top Pharmaceutical University

[3]

Harvard University | University of Cambridge | University of California, San Francisco | University College London | University of North Carolina | University of Arizona | University of South Florida | Karolinska Institute | Yale University | King's College London | University of California, San Diego | Cardiff University | Stanford University | The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine | The University of Manchester | The University of Texas | Utrecht University | The University of Dundee | Columbia University | Monash University | University of Oxford | Pierre and Marie Curie University | Medical University of Vienna | Rockefeller University | Uppsala University | University of Pennsylvania | University of Zurich | University of Tuebingen | The Ohio State University | Radboud University Nijmegen | Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Vanderbilt University | McGill University | University of Hamburg | University of Lausanne | University of Paris Descartes | The University of Tokyo | University of California, Berkeley | Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich | Kyoto University | University of Wisconsin – Madison | University of Utah | China Pharmaceutical University. [4]

Market Analysis

Pharmacovigilance (PV) Market Analysis by Clinical Trial Phase:

The global pharmacovigilance (PV) market is projected to reach 10.27 billion USD by 2025. The market is expected to see a growth at 13.1% CAGR owing to increasing incidence of Adverse Drug Reaction. The key driver for the growth of pharmacovigilance market is ADR’s. In 2015, the U.S. FDA received almost 253,017 serious adverse events and 44,693 deaths associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This shows the possible demand for instigating safety and pharmacovigilance services.

Rising demand for drugs have been significantly amplified and the need for novel therapeutics development via extensive clinical trials, which is further expected to serve this market with lucrative opportunities. North America region held the largest share of the pharmacovigilance and drug safety software market in 2014. However, Asian and Latin American countries symbolize high growth markets. This is owing to a rise in research outsourcing by pharmaceutical giants and growing public and private investments in pharmaceutical Research and Development (R&D) in these emerging nations.

Major pharmaceutical companies are involved in extensive R&D initiatives for development of innovative therapeutic molecules. This has resulted in increased rate of drug development. Manufacturers are now focusing on remodeling their product development processes in an attempt to cater to patient needs across the globe. These factors are anticipated to fuel the demand for PV services.

In April 2017, Accenture entered into a collaborative agreement with BioCelebrate to develop a platform for aggregating and analyzing clinical information for improvement in drug developing efficiency, thus enhancing its R&D capabilities. These factors are anticipated to fuel the market growth. North America region held the largest share of the pharmacovigilance and drug safety software market in 2014. However, Asian and Latin American countries symbolize high growth markets. This is owing to a rise in research outsourcing by pharmaceutical giants and growing public and private investments in pharmaceutical R&D in these emerging nations. The global pharmacovigilance (PV) market size was estimated at USD 3.40 billion in 2016 and is anticipated to witness a CAGR of 13.1% over the forecast period. Increasing incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) is expected to accelerate the demand for pharmacovigilance services over the forecast period.

Growing prevalence of chronic diseases is another major contributor for the PV growth. Treatment of these chronic diseases require uptake of combination of drugs resulting in ADR. To curb this problem, PV services are used. According to statistics published in Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), in 2014, ADR is one of the leading causes of mortality in the U.S. resulting in more than 100,000 deaths every year.

Call for Contributions

All honorable authors are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts, papers and e-posters. Also, high-quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of pharmacovigilance and drug safety are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. The conference solicits contributions of abstracts, papers and e-posters that address themes and topics of the conference, including figures, tables and references of novel research materials.

== Conference Proceedings == and other index databases All submitted conference papers will be blind peer reviewed by three competent reviewers. The post-conference proceedings will be abstracted and indexed in the International Science Index, and submitted to be indexed in the Google Scholar, Scopus and Thomson Reuters, and other index databases. The conference abstracts and proceedings book, CD and certificate of presentation will be distributed to participants at the conference registration desk.

Special Journal Issues

ICPDS 2018 has teamed up with the Special Journal Issue on Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety. A number of selected high-impact full-text papers will also be considered for the special journal issues. All submitted papers will have the opportunity to be considered for this Special Journal Issue. The paper selection will be carried out during the prior review process as well as at the conference presentation stage. Submitted papers must not be under consideration by any other journal or publication. The final decision for paper selection will be made based on peer review reports by the Guest Editors and the Editor-in-Chief jointly. Selected full-text papers will be published online free of charge.

Journal of Pharmacovigilance is an Open Access journal and aims to publish most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all areas of the field and making them freely available through online without any restrictions or any other subscriptions to researchers worldwide. The Journal of Pharmacovigilance is an open access peer-reviewed journal. Our full open-access policy, which makes all published material immediately available to the public and it is especially relevant when it comes to information about drugs safety and toxicity.

The Pharmacovigilance Peer Reviewed Journal is proficiently supported by universally prominent Editorial Board members. Pharmacovigilance journal impact factor is mainly calculated based on the number of articles that undergo a double-blind peer review process by competent Editorial Board so as to ensure excellence, the essence of the work and number of citations received for the same published articles. Abstracts and full texts of all articles published by Pharmacovigilance Open Access Journal are freely accessible to everyone immediately after publication.

Conference Sponsor and Exhibitor Opportunities

Important Dates

Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline   March 20, 2018
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection   March 31, 2018
Final Paper (Camera Ready) Submission & Early Bird Registration Deadline   April 10, 2018
Conference Dates   May 10 - 11, 2018


Important Dates

Registration Fees

Participation Type Early Registration Fees Registration Fees
Non-Student Oral/Poster Presenter Registration 450 € 500 €
Student Oral/Poster Presenter Registration 350 € 400 €
Listener Registration 250 € 300 €
Additional Fees
Additional Paper Publication 100 €
Extra Proceedings Book 50 €

Author Conference Registration includes Paper Presentation, Proceedings Volume Part (where your paper is published), Proceedings CD, Attendance to all Sessions, Conference Programme, Name Tag, Luncheons and Coffee Breaks, Certificate of Attendance and Presentation, and Small Handbag.

Listener Conference Registration includes Attendance to All Sessions, Proceedings CD, Conference Programme, Name Tag, Luncheons and Coffee Breaks, Certificate of Attendance and Small Handbag.

Early Bird Registration

Early Bird registration is valid until 2018-04-10 23:59:59.

Selected Conference Papers

A list of the selected conference papers for the event and their respective author/s:

1)Hormones and Mineral Elements Associated with Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women in Eastern Slovakia M. Mydlárová Blaščáková, J. Poráčová, Z. Tomková, Ľ. Blaščáková, M. Nagy, M. Konečná, E. Petrejčíková, Z. Gogaľová, V. Sedlák, J. Mydlár, M. Zahatňanská, K. Hricová  2)Patient Support Program in Pharmacovigilance: Foster Patient Confidence and Compliance Atul Khurana, Rajul Rastogi, Hans-Joachim Gamperl 3)Adverse Drug Reactions Monitoring in the Northern Region of Zambia Ponshano Kaselekela, Simooya O. Oscar, Lunshano Boyd 4)Microfluidic Paper-Based Electrochemical Biosensor Ahmad Manbohi, Seyyed Hamid Ahmadi  5)Geochemical Study of Natural Bitumen, Condensate and Gas Seeps from Sousse Area, Central Tunisia A. Belhaj Mohamed, M. Saidi, N. Boucherb, N. Ourtani, A. Soltani, I. Bouazizi, M. Ben Jrad 6)Transnational Higher Education: Developing a Transnational Student Success 'Signature' for Pre-Clinical Medical Students – An Action Research Project W. Maddison 7)Study of Reporting System for Adverse Events Related to Common Medical Devices at a Tertiary Care Public Sector Hospital in India S. Kurien, S. Satpathy, S. K. Gupta, S. K. Arya, D. K. Sharma 8)Pre-Clinical Studying of Antitumor Ramon Preparation: Acute Toxicity Raissa A. Muzychkina, Irina M. Korulkina, Dmitriy Yu. Korulkin 9)Pre-Clinical Studying of Antitumor Ramon Preparation: Specific Activity Raissa A. Muzychkina, Irina M. Korulkina, Dmitriy Yu. Korulkin 10)Pre-Clinical Studying of Antitumor Ramon Preparation: Chronic Toxicity Raissa A. Muzychkina, Irina M. Korulkina, Dmitriy Yu. Korulkin 11)Current Situation and Possible Solutions of Acid Rain in South Korea Dhongkyu Yoon 12)Genetic Polymorphism of the Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia and Hyperhomocysteinemia its Relation with the for a Group of Children in the East of Algeria Yahia Massinissa, Kalla A, Yahia M, Benbia S 13)Antioxidant Responses to Different Exposure Regimes of Kazakhstan Light Crude Oil in Livers of Male Albino Rats K. Mahmoud, T. Shalahmetova, B. Umbayev, Sh. Deraz[5]

  • The conference program emphasizes evidence-based practise, educational innovation, practical application, and peer to peer networking and collaboration. The goals of the conference are to provide a transformative professional development experience through.
  • Bringing together the world’s scientific experts to catalyze and advance scientific knowledge about Pharmacovigilance & Drug Safety present the most recent research findings, and promote and enhance scientific collaborations around the world.
  • Bringing together community leaders, scientists, and policy leaders to promote and enhance programmatic collaborations to more effectively address regional, national and local responses to Elderly Population around the world and overcome barriers that limit access to care and services.
  • Bulleted list item

International Scientific Committee[6]

Prabhat Singhal Harvard Medical School, US
Harry Xia Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, US
Armando Gomez University of Guanajuato, MX
Sani Ismaila Usmanu Danfodiyo University, NG
Dawit Gizachew Purdue University Northwest,
Hanaa Mm El-Khayat Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, EG
Basim Almayahi University of Kufa, IQ
Sathish Kumar Manoharan Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, IN
Daniel Monleon Fundacion Investigacion Hospital Clinico Universitario Valencia, ES
Wilfred Abia Institute for Management and Professional Training, CM
Ekatherina Charvalos Iaso Clinic, GR
Seshadri Reddy Varikasuvu Bps Government Medical College, IN
Bushra Munir Government College University Faisalabad, PK
Naazneen Khan National Institute of Malaria Research, IN
Anthony Au Universiti Sains Malaysia, MY
Mohammad Ishaq Geer University of Kashmir, IN
Fatemeh Shariati Islamic Azad University, IR
Kausalya Ramanan Bharath University, IN
Kanchan Kumari Patna University, IN
Asiya Afshan Accenture Services, IN
Samiran Bisai Vidyasagar University, IN
Omkar Prasad Baidya R. I. M. S., IN
Shafaat Khan Comsats Institute of Information Technology, PK
Kamna Srivastava University of Delhi, IN
Debmalya Barh Institute of Integrative Omics and Applied Biotechnology, IN
Karthikeyan Muthusamy Alagappa University, IN

Federated Conference

Federated conference series is an event that brings together a significant number of recurring events; academic conferences, symposia, workshops, special sessions, and plenary talks in the field of science and technology since inception in 1999. Each event may run over any span of time within the conference days.

The EuroSciCon will be organizing European Congress on Pharma 2019 conference focus on Advancements & Future of Pharmaceutical Sciences from May 30-31, 2019 in Oslo, Norway. The theme of this year’s meeting is Desired Innovations that can change The Future Of Pharmacy

European Congress on Pharma 2019 offers a best stage with its proficient legitimate program to the social event of individuals which consolidates instinctive board discoursed, keynote addresses, all-hands gatherings and notice sessions on the topics Drug transport, Biotechnology, Gene Therapy, Therapeutic Biological Products, BABE, Biosimilars, Clinical Trails, Drug Discovery, current issues in Bioequivalence, Pharmaceutical Innovation in the 21st Century, new coherent approaches to managing overall managerial measures. Biopharmaceutical Companies and Market Analysis, The get-together invites delegates from Biopharma associations, Pharmacists, Academicians, Clinicians, Researchers, Health mind specialists, understudies, business operators and Young authorities over the globe giving a predominant stage, interconnecting the latest research, creative enhancements in the field and furthermore helpful viewpoints.

References.

Important Notes

Please ensure your submission meets the conference's strict guidelines for accepting scholarly papers. Downloadable versions of the checklist for Full-Text Papers and Abstract Papers. Please refer to the Paper Submission GUIDE before submitting your paper.

Scientifically Sponsored by: International Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences Committee.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 https://www.waset.org/conference/2019/05/Amsterdam/ICPDS/home
  2. https://waset.org/Publications
  3. https://pharmacovigilance.pharmaceuticalconferences.com/
  4. https://pharmacovigilance.pharmaceuticalconferences.com/
  5. https://waset.org/conference/2019/05/amsterdam/ICPDS
  6. https://www.waset.org/conference/2019/05/amsterdam/ICPDS/committees

Verification history